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Today's Thought

No one plants a seed in the morning and eats the fruit in the evening. Parenting is a lot like gardening. What we sow today will be reached in a future season.

- Mark Driscoll

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 Agriculture News

KHRT Agriculture News - 07/29/19

Weekly Crop Report......

    FARGO, N.D. - For the week ending July 28th, there were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service.

    Topsoil moisture supplies rated 6 percent very short, 19 short, 66 adequate, and 9 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 7 percent very short, 16 short, 68 adequate, and 9 surplus.

    Field Crops Report

    Soybean condition rated 1 percent very poor, 8 poor, 26 fair, 58 good, and 7 excellent. Soybeans blooming was 71 percent, well behind 94 last year, and behind 85 for the five-year average. Setting pods was 26 percent, well behind 65 last year and 50 average.

    Spring wheat condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 19 fair, 67 good, and 11 excellent. Spring wheat headed was 98 percent, near 99 last year and 97 average. Coloring was 50 percent, well behind 73 last year, and behind 66 average. Mature was 4 percent, behind 19 last year.

    Durum wheat condition rated 0 percent very poor, 8 poor, 27 fair, 59 good, and 6 excellent. Durum wheat headed was 96 percent. Coloring was 24 percent, well behind 59 last year and 48 average. Mature was 2 percent.

    Winter wheat condition rated 0 percent very poor, 6 poor, 21 fair, 61 good, and 12 excellent. Winter wheat coloring was 86 percent, behind 95 last year and 91 average. Mature was 40 percent, well behind 60 last year. Harvested was 1 percent, behind 10 last year and 14 average.

    Corn condition rated 1 percent very poor, 5 poor, 19 fair, 64 good, and 11 excellent. Corn silking was 38 percent, well behind 83 last year and 59 average.

    Canola condition rated 0 percent very poor, 5 poor, 25 fair, 62 good, and 8 excellent. Canola coloring was 11 percent, well behind 58 last year and 46 average.

    Sugarbeet condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 5 fair, 15 good, and 79 excellent.

    Oats condition rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 18 fair, 61 good, and 19 excellent. Oats headed was 96 percent, near 99 last year, and equal to average. Coloring was 38 percent, well behind 71 last year and 70 average.

    Barley condition rated 0 percent very poor, 2 poor, 16 fair, 71 good, and 11 excellent. Barley headed was 97 percent, near 99 last year, and equal to average. Coloring was 57 percent, well behind 82 last year, and behind 76 average. Mature was 4 percent, well behind 37 last year.

    Dry edible peas condition rated 0 percent very poor, 5 poor, 21 fair, 68 good, and 6 excellent. Dry edible peas blooming was 95 percent. Dropping leaves was 33 percent, well behind 57 last year.

    Sunflower condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 20 fair, 73 good, and 4 excellent. Sunflowers blooming was 22 percent, well behind 50 last year, and behind 32 average.

    Flaxseed condition rated 0 percent very poor, 6 poor, 23 fair, 69 good, and 2 excellent. Flaxseed blooming was 94 percent, equal to both last year and average. Coloring was 8 percent, well behind 30 last year and 29 average.

    Potato condition rated 0 percent very poor, 0 poor, 18 fair, 69 good, and 13 excellent. Potatoes blooming was 96 percent, equal to last year. Rows closed was 78 percent, near 74 last year, and ahead of 65 average.

    Dry edible bean condition rated 0 percent very poor, 1 poor, 20 fair, 69 good, and 10 excellent. Dry edible beans blooming was 81 percent, behind 91 last year, and near 82 average. Setting pods was 43 percent, behind 56 last year.

    Alfalfa condition rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 23 fair, 52 good, and 18 excellent. Alfalfa first cutting was 93 percent. Second cutting was 18 percent, behind 35 last year and 36 average.

    Pasture and Range Report

    Pasture and range conditions rated 1 percent very poor, 6 poor, 19 fair, 58 good, and 16 excellent.

    Stock water supplies rated 1 percent very short, 10 short, 80 adequate, and 9 surplus.

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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - An agricultural economist says the Trump administration's decision to base new handouts to farmers hit by the trade war with China on how many acres they've planted might be a fairer way to distribute the cash than the previous per bushel payments.

    U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced Thursday that it will pay another $16 billion in aid to farmers affected by the president's trade war with China. It comes after an $11 billion bailout Trump gave farmers last year. The new aid shifts from paying farmers a per-bushel rate for affected crops to paying them by how many acres they've planted and their location.

    Scott Irwin, a University of Illinois agricultural economist says the previous program heavily weighted toward payments to soybean growers and based on bushels, "didn't make any sense."

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    BISMARCK, N.D. (NDDA) - The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released more details of the $16 billion package announced earlier this year that will assist agricultural producers in response to retaliation and trade disruption.

    "We appreciate the support that these programs will provide to our farmers and ranchers in the short term," Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said. "We continue to look for long term solutions and are hopeful that things can be resolved soon."

    The trade aid consists of:

    - $14.5 billion for the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), which consists of payments to producers of eligible crops and livestock;

    - $1.4 billion for a Food Purchase and Distribution Program (FPDP) to purchase surplus commodities for distribution to food banks, schools and low-income services; and

    - $100 million for an Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP) to assist in developing new export markets.

    MFP signup begins at local Farm Service Agency offices today and runs through Friday, Dec. 6. Producers of selected non-specialty crops, specialty crops, dairy and hogs may be eligible. Payments will be made in up to three rounds, with the second and third rounds evaluated as market conditions and trade opportunities dictate. All farmers who qualify will collect at least $15 per acre in direct subsidies initially with payment rates assigned by county.

    County rates may be found at https://www.fsa.usda.gov/programs-and-services/market-facilitation-progr.... Full details on the MFP may be found on USDA's website at https://www.farmers.gov/manage/mfp.

    The FPDP will purchase surplus commodities affected by trade retaliation through the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) such as fruits, vegetables, some processed foods, beef, pork, lamb, poultry and milk for distribution by the Food and Nutrition Service to food banks, schools and other outlets serving low-income individuals. AMS will buy affected products in four phases starting after Oct. 1, with deliveries beginning in Jan. 2020. Details on becoming a USDA food vendor are available at https://www.ams.usda.gov/selling-food/becoming-approved.

    Recently, USDA awarded the $100 million in ATP funds to 48 organizations to help U.S. farmers and ranchers identify and access new export markets. Funding recipients included the national groups for several of North Dakota's top crops including: dry beans, grains, wheat, dry pea and lentils, soybeans and potatoes. A full listing of recipients may be found at https://www.fas.usda.gov/atp-funding-allocations.

 

 

   (Copyright 2019 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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