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Heaven is not our reason for loving God. Heaven is our reward for God loving us.

- Tullian Tchividjian

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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 07/19/18

Republican U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer has been named to a conference committee to work out differences between the House and Senate versions of the 2018 farm bill....

     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - Republican U.S. Rep. Kevin Cramer has been named to a conference committee to work out differences between the House and Senate versions of the 2018 farm bill.
 
     The legislation would renew farm programs such as crop subsidies, insurance and land conservation. The negotiations come amid low commodity prices and farmers increasingly are worried that trade disputes may depress commodity prices further. Cramer says he doesn't see a quick resolution to the trade disputes.
 
     Cramer says proposed changes to food stamps are the biggest obstacle in the farm bill negotiations. The House wants to tighten work requirements for recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The Senate version largely avoided any changes to the program.
 
     The Senate has not named its conferees.
 
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     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - North Dakota's Agriculture Department has launched a program to help dairy operations in the state with the cost of complying with national rules for fluid milk. Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring says the North Dakota Dairy Improvement Assistance Program will provide cost-share help to dairy operations for improvements such as new water wells, rural water connections and floor repairs. The goal is to help the operations comply with the federal Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. Goehring says $186,000 is available. Applicants can receive a maximum of $3,000. The money is coming from savings in other areas of the department's budget.
 
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     MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - American farmers have put the brakes on unnecessary spending as the U.S.-China trade war escalates. But they say there isn't much more they can do except hope the two countries work out their differences before the full impact of China's retaliatory tariffs hits American soybean and pork producers.
 
     President Donald Trump this month imposed 25 percent tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese products. China responded with similar duties on the same amount of U.S. imports. The administration followed with a second possible round, and Beijing vowed a "firm and forceful" response.
 
     Soybean farmer Michael Petefish says all farmers can do is wait and hope, which he says aren't very good options. Petefish, president of the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association, says they can also make themselves heard in Washington.
 

 

   (Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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