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The ultimate test of our spirituality is the measure of our amazement at the grace of God.

- Martyn Lloyd-Jones

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 Agriculture News

KHRT AGRICULTURE NEWS - 02/05/18

North Dakota has more cattle and sheep than it did a year ago....

     BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) - North Dakota's Agriculture Department is allowing border-area applicators of the controversial weed killer dicamba to do their mandatory training in Minnesota or South Dakota. But the agency says applicators will need to carry evidence of the training in the field and be prepared to provide it to inspectors upon demand.
 
     Non-resident applicators seeking a North Dakota pesticide certification also are being allowed to submit evidence of dicamba-specific training in another state with their application.
 
     New federal rules classify dicamba as a restricted-use herbicide, and applicators are required to undergo training. The new rules are in response to complaints around the country of dicamba drift damaging neighboring crops.

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    BISMARCK, N.D. - Livestock producers now have until May 1 before they must report hazardous substance air releases from animal waste under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals has granted the Environmental Protection Agency's motion to delay the mandate, which was originally to be implemented Jan. 22. The law will require producers to report releases that meet or exceed 100 pounds of ammonia or hydrogen sulfide within a 24-hour period.

    CERCLA and a related law, the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), have always required such reporting in order to help federal, state and local officials evaluate the need for an emergency response to mitigate the effects of the release to the community.

    "Previously farms were exempted from these requirements, but environmental and animal rights activist groups such as HSUS and the Waterkeeper Alliance sued EPA, and the courts eliminated the exemptions," Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said.

    Goehring said there is not clear guidance for producers to help determine if they are required to report. He recently met with the EPA and there is continuing discussion concerning the reporting requirements.

    "We will work with our congressional delegation to seek a legislative fix to the mandatory reporting," Goehring said.

    Producers can visit www.epa.gov/animalwaste to look at models to help determine if they are affected. No reporting is necessary until the mandate is issued.

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    MANDAN, ND - Attendees at the North Dakota Farmers Market and Growers Association (NDFMGA) & Local Foods Conference held Friday learned that the Hunger Free ND Garden Project has recorded volunteer donations of more than 2.3 million pounds of fresh produce to food pantries, soup kitchens, and other charitable community programs since the program started in 2010.

    "In eight seasons, North Dakota growers have donated more than 2.3 million pounds of produce to help address the issue of food insecurity in our state," Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said.

    The Hunger Free ND Garden Project was started by the North Dakota Department of Agriculture (NDDA) in partnership with the Great Plains Food Bank. The statewide project encourages home gardeners and commercial growers to plant extra produce each year for donation to charitable organizations across the state.

    "The 2017 growing year alone brought in more than 486,000 pounds of produce," Goehring said. "Thanks to more growers, volunteers and community support, donations hit an all-time high this year."

    At approximately four servings per pound, the 2017 donations provided more than 1.8 million servings of fruits and vegetables to help the wellbeing of North Dakota residents.

    A three-acre sweet corn plot planted by NDDA contributed over 48,000 pounds to the project in 2017. Other sweet corn plot partners included: Lincoln-Oakes Nurseries, the Great Plains Food Bank, Missouri Valley Ag, Hubbard Feeds, 4-H and North Dakota FFA.

    Additional sponsors helping make the harvest event possible are: Cloverdale, Morton County 4-H, Royse's Twin City Produce, USDA-ARS-PA Northern Great Plains Research Lab, USDA-NRCS Plant Materials Center, Sara Lee/Bimbo Bakeries, Spiffy Biffs, Bismarck Parks & Rec and Farm Credit Services of Mandan.

    Other partners in the project include: NDSU Extension Service, NDSU Master Gardeners, North Dakota FFA, Dakota College at Bottineau ~ Entrepreneurial Center for Horticulture, Northern Plains Sustainable Ag Society, the North Dakota Farmers Market and Growers Association, Healthy North Dakota, Creating a Hunger Free ND Coalition, and Pride of Dakota.

 

   (Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

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    FARGO, N.D. - All cattle and calves in North Dakota as of January 1, 2018 totaled 1.86 million head, up 2 percent from January 1, 2017, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service.

    All cows and heifers that had calved totaled 1.00 million head, up 3 percent from last year.

    Beef cows totaled 984,500 head, up 3 percent from last year.

    Milk cows totaled 15,500 head, down 3 percent from January 1, 2017.

    All heifers 500 pounds and over totaled 440,000 head, up 2 percent from last year.

    Steers weighing 500 pounds and over totaled 240,000 head, down 6 percent from last year.

    Bulls weighing 500 pounds and over totaled 70,000 head, up 8 percent from last year.

    Calves under 500 pounds totaled 110,000 head, up 10 percent from January 1, 2017.

    All cattle on feed fed for slaughter in North Dakota feedlots totaled 58,000 head, up 16 percent from the previous year.

    The 2017 calf crop totaled 960,000 head, up 5 percent from 2016.

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    FARGO, N.D. - All sheep and lamb inventory in North Dakota on
January 1, 2018 totaled 70,000 head, up 4,000 from last year, according to the
USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service.

    Breeding sheep inventory totaled 49,000 head, down 3,000 from last year and is a record low. Ewes one year and older totaled 39,000 head, down 3,000 from the previous year and is a record low. Rams one year and older totaled 2,000, unchanged from last year. Total replacement lambs totaled 8,000 head, unchanged from last year.

    Market sheep and lambs totaled 21,000 head, up 7,000 from last year. A total of 1,000 head were mature sheep (one year and older) while the remaining 20,000 were under one year. Market lamb weight groups were estimated as follows: 4,000 lambs were under 65 pounds; 5,000 were 65-84 pounds; 6,000 were 85-105 pounds; 5,000 were over 105 pounds.

    The 2017 lamb crop totaled 49,000 head, down 2,000 from 2016. The 2017 lambing rate was 117 per 100 ewes one year and older, compared with 116 in 2016.

    Sheep deaths totaled 2,000 head, down 500 from 2016 and is a record low.

    Lamb deaths totaled 6,000 head, unchanged from last year.

    Sheep and lambs slaughtered on farm totaled 700 head, up 200 from 2016.

    Shorn wool production during 2017 was 435,000 pounds, up 5,000 from 2016. Sheep and lambs shorn totaled 62,000 head, up 3,000 from 2016. Weight per fleece was 7.0 pounds, down 0.3 from last year. The average price paid for wool sold in 2017 was $1.09 per pound, compared with $1.13 in 2016. The total value of wool produced in North Dakota was 474,000 dollars in 2017.

 


   (Copyright 2018 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

 

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